Broad Street Bicycle Boulevard Plan Kick Off

In late March of 2016, the City of San Luis Obispo will hold an initial community meeting to begin the process of developing the Broad Street Bicycle Boulevard Plan, which improves bike options along Broad Street from Ramona Street south to Monterey Street.

The meeting takes place on March 24, 2016 from 6-8 PM at the SLO County Public Library, 995 Palm St, SLO, CA 93403 (map)

According to the City of SLO’s Press Release:

SLO emblem_rgb_for dk bkgd_sm“The City of San Luis Obispo invites you to a neighborhood meeting on Thursday, March 24, 2016, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM at the City/County Library, 995 Palm Street, to kick of the process for developing the Broad Street Bicycle Boulevard Plan. The project is intended to provide a through route for bicyclists and pedestrians serving the downtown core and neighborhoods to the north. The Plan will look at Broad Street from Ramona Street toMonterey Street, including a future bicycle/pedestrian overcrossing of Highway 101. Your participation at this meeting is valuable and appreciated. To subscribe to project updates and/or provide feedback on the project, visit the City’s online forum at https://www.peakdemocracy.com/3444.

Project Managers Jennifer Rice and Luke Schwartz are also available and can be reached at JRice@slocity.org and LSchwartz@slocity.org, or via phone at (805) 781-7190.

Bicycle Boulevard

San Luis Obispo Goes for the Gold

San Luis Obispo wins Gold Level Status

UPDATE: Join us at 11 a.m. on Friday April 15th, 2016 on the steps of SLO City Hall (map) for a ribbon cutting ceremony to mark and celebrate San Luis Obispo’s distinction as a Gold Bike Friendly Community. 

Today when the League of American Bicyclists updated their list of Bicycle Friendly Communities (BFC) there was great news for the people of SLO. The City of San Luis Obispo, which was previously designated as a Silver level BFC, has earning the next highest designation, that of Gold.

“Bike SLO County couldn’t be more excited to hear the news that SLO was designated as a Gold Bike Friendly Community BFC Chartthis morning.” said Dan Rivoire, Executive Director of Bike SLO County. “As we join three other Gold Level cities in California and twenty-three Gold Level cities throughout the US, people in our City and County are starting to really realize how awesome it is that our community is building safer streets for everyone. Today, we’re feeling especially proud of our hard work and evermore thankful to local residents, supporters, and city staff that are getting new bike friendly projects on every passing month.”

According to Rivoire “California has 55 Bicycle Friendly Communities, 4 of which are in San Luis Obispo County. This means that a little over 7% of the Bicycle Friendly Communities in California are in SLO County. That is great news for SLO County and we hope to see the numbers grow in the coming years. We already have The City of SLO (Gold), Paso Robles (Bronze), Arroyo Grande (Bronze) and Morro Bay (Bronze). We look forward to continued work with other cities throughout the County to make SLO County even more bike friendly.”

“Winning a Bicycle Friendly Community designation shows a community’s dedication to creating safer and better places to ride your bike.” said Alex Doty, executive director of the League of American Bicyclists.

What is a Bicycle Friendly Community?

A BFC welcomes bicyclists by providing safe accommodations for bicycling and encouraging people to bike for transportation and recreation. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life.

The BFC program provides a roadmap for building a Bicycle Friendly Community. Since the program’s inception, more than 800 distinct communities have applied and the five levels of the award – Diamond*, Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze – provide a clear incentive for communities to continuously improve. Communities complete a 100+ question application, which is then reviewed by national experts as well as members of their local cycling community. All applicants receive extensive feedback. Communities must renew their designation every four years. (*There are currently no communities at the Diamond level.)

To apply or learn more about the BFC program, visit bikeleague.org/community.

California State Bike & Ped Plan

Triple California Bicycling by 2020?

On Tuesday, October 27th, 2015, Caltrans Director Michael Dougherty joined us at the California Bicycle Summit in San Diego. During his plenary session speech “Pedaling Toward a Low Carbon Transportation System: As Easy As Riding A Bike”, Director Dougherty announced the csbpp600creation of the first ever California State Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan (CSBPP), which aims to support and encourage active transportation while increasing safe bicycling and walking opportunities across the state. California has set a target to triple bicycling and double walking by 2020 by improving these options for all Californians.

The CSBPP will take two years to complete and will include the following phases:

  1. Developing goals and objectives (Fall 2015/Winter 2016)
  2. Assessing implementation needs (Winter 2016)
  3. Identifying gaps in the bicycle and pedestrian networks (Winter/Spring 2016)
  4. Creating recommendations (Summer 2016)
  5. Reviewing the draft and final CSBPP (Fall 2016/Winter 2017)

Input from the public is needed. To get started, take the survey at cabikepedplan.org. Throughout the two year process there will be additional opportunities to help shape the CSBPP. Sign up for email updates to get the latest information about CSBPP: Email update sign up.

 

Advocacy Alert

Los Osos Bike Lanes

Stand up for Protected Bike Lanes in Los Osos

The Los Osos Community Advisory Council (LOCAC) is meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 28 at the South Bay Community Center to discuss the possibility of protected bike lanes on Los Osos Valley Road in Los Osos. We’d love to see LOCAC endorse protected bike lanes and strongly encourage all Los Osos area bicyclists, bicyclists who regularly ride Los Osos Valley Road and anyone who wants to show support to attend the meeting.

With LOCAC’s endorsement, it will be easier to convince the SLO County Public Works staff that there is community support for protected bike lanes. Please come out and stand up for better bike infrastructure in Los Osos. Better roads in Los Osos benefit bicycle riders (and automobile drivers) countywide.

What: Los Osos Community Advisory Council Meeting on Protected Bike Lanes

When: Thursday, May 28 7:00 PM

Where: South Bay Community Center, 2180 Palisades Avenue, Los Osos, 93402 (map)

Why: Bike Lanes!

SLO County Bike Trails

Tuesday February 24th is a busy day for bikes in SLO County. The Board of Supervisors will meet to consider approving the final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for a 4.5-mile extension of the Bob Jones Trail from the historic Octagon Barn, then SLOCOG hosts the first community meeting on the Edna Price Canyon Multi-Use Anza Trail later that evening. Details about both events follow below.

Bob Jones Trail

octagonbarn440The SLO County Board of Supervisors is considering a big step toward extending the Bob Jones Trail on Tuesday, Feb. 24: certifying the Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for a 4.5-mile extension of the trail from the historic Octagon Barn on Higuera Street to the trail’s staging area on Ontario Road. The board is also considering approving the trail’s alignment, which includes undercrossings of San Luis Bay Drive and Highway 101.

What can you do?

1. Attend the hearing, which is scheduled at 1:30 p.m. – the first item after the Board of Supervisors’ lunch break. It will be in the County Government Center, 1055 Monterey St., SLO. Bring a bicycle helmet to identify yourself as a bicyclist. We’ll also be distributing “I <3 Bob Jones Trail” placards that people can hold to show support. People are welcome to speak in support of the trail, but we’re more interested in having a good turnout. 2. If you haven’t taken the brief survey about the Bob Jones Trail at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DMXCMMM, please do so. We will compile the data and present it to the Board of Supervisors. We want as many trail users to take the online questionnaire as possible. 3. Send an e-mail to your county supervisor or the entire board asking them to certify the Final EIR and approve the trail alignment. Supervisors and their e-mails are:

District 1: Frank Mecham – fmecham@co.slo.ca.us

District 2: Bruce Gibson – bgibson@co.slo.ca.us

District 3: Adam Hill – ahill@co.slo.ca.us

District 4: Lynn Compton – lcompton@co.slo.ca.us

District 5: Debbie Arnold – darnold@co.slo.ca.us

Edna Price Canyon Multi-Use Anza Trail

The Edna Price Canyon Anza Trail Project Workshop #1 takes place on Tuesday, February 24th, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (formal presentation 6:00-6:20) at the Los Ranchos Elementary School Library: 5785 Los Ranchos Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401.

What can you do?

By attending this meeting, you will have a first-hand opportunity to provide invaluable feedback that is essential in shaping the future of this recreational opportunity and community connector. Workshop participants will be invited to:

  • Learn about the Edna Price Canyon Anza Trail project
  • Identify how and where you currently use the corridor
  • Help develop a future vision for this trail between San Luis Obispo and Pismo Beach
  • Document any opportunities, concerns, or issues you would like addressed in the project
  • Please bring your friends and neighbors to both meetings to push for the future of great bike trails in SLO County!

    The Bob Jones Trail Needs Your Help

    Tell the SLO County Board of Supervisors to move forward with the Bob Jones Trail

    Tuesday, February 24th is a busy day for bicycles in San Luis Obispo county. Yesterday we talked about octagonbarn440SLOCOG’s Edna Price Canyon Anza Trail Project Workshop #1 taking place on the night of February 24th, and today we’re highlighting the upcoming SLO County Board of Supervisors certification of the Final Environmental Impact Report for a 4.5 mile section of the Bob Jones Trail earlier the same day.

    Help complete the Bob Jones Trail

    The Friends of the Bob Jones Trail (a partnership of the San Luis Obispo County Bicycle Coalition and the Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County) needs your help on an important milestone regarding the long-awaited extension of the Bob Jones Trail. On Tuesday, Feb. 24, the SLO County Board of Supervisors will consider certifying the Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for a 4.5-mile extension of the trail from the historic Octagon Barn on Higuera Street to the trail’s staging area on Ontario Road. The board will also approve the trail’s alignment, which includes under-crossings of San Luis Bay Drive and Highway 101.

    What can you do?

    1. Mark February 24 on your calendar. We won’t know what time the public hearing is scheduled until a week before the meeting, but want as many people as possible to attend to show their support for the Bob Jones Trail. Families with children are especially encouraged to attend to underscore the importance of introducing children to nature and recreational activities. The meeting will take place in the Board of Supervisors’ chambers, County Government Center, 1055 Monterey St., SLO, CA 93401. We will let you know what time as soon as that information becomes available.

    2. Take a brief survey about the Bob Jones Trail at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DMXCMMM. We will compile the data and present it to the Board of Supervisors. We want as many trail users as possible to take the online questionnaire.

    3. Send an e-mail to your county supervisor or the entire board asking them to certify the Final EIR and approve the trail alignment. Supervisors and their e-mails are:

    District 1: Frank Mecham – fmecham@co.slo.ca.us

    District 2: Bruce Gibson – bgibson@co.slo.ca.us

    District 3: Adam Hill – ahill@co.slo.ca.gov

    District 4: Lynn Compton – lcompton@co.slo.ca.us

    District 5: Debbie Arnold – darnold@co.slo.ca.us

    The Friends of the Bob Jones Trail is a partnership of the San Luis Obispo County Bicycle Coalition and the Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County. Our No. 1 goal is encouraging and shepherding completion of the trail in a more timely fashion. The EIR is posted on the SLO County Planning Departments website at www.sloplanning.org under “Environmental Impact Reports.”

    Connecting San Luis Obispo & Pismo Beach

    Come share your vision for a multi-use trail connecting San Luis Obispo & Pismo Beach!

    Would you like to see a trail connecting San Luis Obispo & Pismo Beach? If you answered yes, this is your chance to stand up and be heard! The San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) is inviting residents and trail users to attend the first community meeting on the Edna Price Canyon Multi-Use Anza Trail on Tuesday, February 24th at the Los Ranchos Elementary School library in San Luis Obispo.

    By attending this meeting, slocoganza440you will have a first-hand opportunity to provide invaluable feedback that is essential in shaping the future of this recreational opportunity and community connector. Workshop participants will be invited to:

    • Learn about the Edna Price Canyon Anza Trail project
    • Identify how and where you currently use the corridor
    • Help develop a future vision for this trail between San Luis Obispo and Pismo Beach
    • Document any opportunities, concerns, or issues you would like addressed in the project

    Edna Price Canyon Anza Trail Project Workshop #1 takes place on Tuesday, February 24th,  5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (formal presentation 6:00-6:20) at the Los Ranchos Elementary School Library: 5785 Los Ranchos Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401.

    Please bring your friends and neighbors!

    For more information, visit www.sloanza.com (online mapping tool is now available) or please contact Jessica Berry at 805-781-5764 or email jberry@slocog.org.

     

    The Most Powerful Bike Funding Policy in the Nation?

    How San Luis Obispo Established the Most Powerful Bike Funding Policy in the Nation

    By Eric Meyer and Dan Rivoire.

     

    Eight years of careful planning — and a bit of luck — just paid off in a big way for the San Luis Obispo Bicycle Coalition. The central California city recently amended its transportation plan (known as the “Circulation Element” of the general plan) in three very innovative ways.

    First, the city revised its transportation mode objectives, dramatically increasing the bike and pedestrian trip goals.

    The new mode split goal:

    50 percent motor vehicles
    12 percent transit
    20 percent bicycles
    18 percent walking, car pools, and other forms

    This is one of the most pedestrian- and bike-centric modal split objectives in the United States.

    Second, the city changed its roadway analysis from Level of Service to Multi-Modal Level of Service.

    San Luis Obispo rejected Level of Service — an outdated standard that measures transportation projects only on the basis of automobile delay — in favor of Multi-Modal Level of Service. MMLOS puts all modes on a level playing field so that the needs of one mode may only trump the needs of another in a manner designated by the modal hierarchy given to that location.

    With this MMLOS objective in mind, the city re-prioritized the modal hierarchy of all of its streets. Some high-traffic arterials are automobile-focused, then transit, then bikes, then peds. Other streets have different hierarchies. Residential neighborhood streets are prioritized for pedestrians first. Major arterials are prioritized for transit first. It is a complex “complete streets” effort that will balance the needs of all modes in the city over time as streets are rebuilt or modified.

    Third (and most important!): The city created a policy that allocates general fund transportation spending by mode to match the mode share percentage goals desired.

    If you remember only one thing from this article, this is it.

    This policy mandates that our city must allocate general fund transportation spending at the same ratio as the mode share goal desired. Meaning 20 percent of funding needs to go to bicycling.

    This is a huge shift from business as usual in America.

     

    These changes didn’t happen all at once. They happened over the course of about eight years under the guidance of many minds at the Bicycle Coalition and with the help of many hundreds of citizens. If we had tried to make this all happen at once during a Circulation Element update, we would have failed.

    It happened because we focused on the smallest relevant plans first. San Luis Obispo’s first opportunity for meaningful policy change came when the City Planning Commission was approving a Climate Action Plan, with the aim of reducing the city’s greenhouse gas emissions. One of the suggested strategies in this plan was to decrease single occupancy vehicle trips. One way to do that is to encourage an increase in the mode share of alternative modes such as biking and walking. Eric pitched the idea of pushing the bike mode share goal to 20 percent, thinking that we might get 15 percent as a compromise. But in a surprise vote, the entire planning commission agreed to the new 20 percent bike mode share goal.

    In the context of the Climate Action Plan this bike mode share increase didn’t seem that controversial, and the audience in the Planning Commission chamber that night was very enthusiastic. The City Council later easily approved the new Climate Action Plan.

    The trouble was that other older city plans, like the Bicycle Master Plan and the city Circulation Element, still had the old 10 percent bike goal. (Note that the current bike mode share is only about 6 percent.) So a year or two later, when the Bicycle Master Plan came up for review, it was modified to match the Climate Action Plan. Since city staff were able to explain that they were merely updating the bike plan to match the more recent climate action plan, it went through without a hitch.

    A few years later, the city’s transportation and land use plan, known as LUCE (for “Land Use Element and Circulation Element”) came up for review and updating. Eric was appointed chairman of the citizen task force dedicated to overseeing the update. The task force again debated increasing the modal goal over what was in the old LUCE, but what ultimately led to them to approve it was the simple fact that the Planning Commission and City Council had already approved that figure in the two other plans years before.

    In addition to this new modal split objective, the new MMLOS policy and the requirement to allocate transportation funding in the same ratio as the desired modal split were also incorporated into the transportation and land use update.

    This 20 percent mode bike mode share goal would never have been approved in the LUCE had it not already been part of the two smaller plans.

    This is a key point and may be a pathway that others can follow to create similar changes in other jurisdictions.

    Meanwhile, Dan was elected to City Council shortly after the City Planning Commission approved the LUCE update, so when it came before the council, his was the deciding vote that approved it and he is now in a position to help shepherd the new prioritization of funding. Our work to get a place on city boards, as bike advocates, paid off.

    Together these new policies create one of the strongest funding mechanisms for bicycle infrastructure in the nation. We hope that other cities might be able to learn from our efforts.

    None of this would have been possible without the efforts of hundreds of members of the public and the tireless efforts of many Bicycle Coalition Advocates who showed up at City Planning and City Council meetings to voice their concerns and desires. It is the public that creates the demand and the advocate’s job is simply to help the public and the city find the way forward.

    Originally published by the kind folks at The Alliance for Biking and Walking.